Networking and Golf

I've been golfing most of my life. I grew up pretty close to the public golf course. That's not to say I'm an excellent golfer, I still have an atrocious slice and my putting and chipping could use some work as well. Still - I enjoy the game of go

lf. I really love the concept of a single-player games like golf. Golf has been used in movies and television shows as a metaphor for life and an activity to bring about positive introspective thought. I can relate to that, as I've often found myself at peace on the golf course despite whatever mess may await me elsewhere.

So the idea of building a networking event around the game might seem, well, odd. After all most people don't immediately think of networking when they think of golf. On the surface it appears to be about one person, challenging themselves by trying to ignore the distractions of their current environment to focus on the task of putting a little white ball in a cup several hundred yards away. In other words, the game seems to be about hyper-focusing on a single task despite your current company - not because of it. How could that have anything to do with networking?

Since metaphors remain lingering, I'll cut to the chase by simply saying that golf is not just about the act of golfing. How the game naturally pairs with networking is derived from the non-golf part of golf. So when we look at these other aspects, it becomes easy to see how perfectly paired with networking the game can be.

For example, teeing off is usually done as a group. Each member of your team is rooting for you, perhaps offering advice or making sure you're aware of the hazards that lay before you. Armed with the best of intentions, your teammates remain absolutely silent as you address the ball. Knowing that you need to concentrate on the task at hand. Immediately after the ball is struck they help track its path, knowing you're doing your best to keep your head down until the absolute last minute.

Before you even begin to immerse yourself in the game, you've benefitted from the shared experiences of everyone around you. Your teammates become your networked resource throughout the game, invaluable as you ponder ways to avoid sand traps, select the proper club, and plot the possible paths toward the hole. You do more than exchange business cards and share a drink when you golf, you learn about people, humility, competition, success in one of the only games played where you hope to have the lowest score than anybody else.

The act of golf may be played in solitary, but the game is anything but. I hope you'll decide to join us at this year's golf outing for a chance to see why I love the game so much.Rich Text AreaToolbarBold (Ctrl / Alt + Shift + B)Italic (Ctrl / Alt + Shift + I)Strikethrough (Alt + Shift + D)Unordered list (Alt + Shift + U)Ordered list (Alt +

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I've been golfing most of my life. I grew up pretty close to the public golf course. That's not to say I'm an excellent golfer, I still have an atrocious slice and my putting and chipping could use some work as well. Still - I enjoy the game of golf. I really love the concept of a single-player games like golf. Golf has been used in movies and television shows as a metaphor for life and an activity to bring about positive introspective thought. I can relate to that, as I've often found myself at peace on the golf course despite whatever mess may await me elsewhere.
So the idea of building a networking event around the game might seem, well, odd. After all most people don't immediately think of networking when they think of golf. On the surface it appears to be about one person, challenging themselves by trying to ignore the distractions of their current environment to focus on the task of putting a little white ball in a cup several hundred yards away. In other words, the game seems to be about hyper-focusing on a single task despite your current company - not because of it. How could that have anything to do with networking?
Since metaphors remain lingering, I'll cut to the chase by simply saying that golf is not just about the act of golfing. How the game naturally pairs with networking is derived from the non-golf part of golf. So when we look at these other aspects, it becomes easy to see how perfectly paired with networking the game can be.
For example, teeing off is usually done as a group. Each member of your team is rooting for you, perhaps offering advice or making sure you're aware of the hazards that lay before you. Armed with the best of intentions, your teammates remain absolutely silent as you address the ball. Knowing that you need to concentrate on the task at hand. Immediately after the ball is struck they help track its path, knowing you're doing your best to keep your head down until the absolute last minute.
Before you even begin to immerse yourself in the game, you've benefitted from the shared experiences of everyone around you. Your teammates become your networked resource throughout the game, invaluable as you ponder ways to avoid sand traps, select the proper club, and plot the possible paths toward the hole. You do more than exchange business cards and share a drink when you golf, you learn about people, humility, competition, success in one of the only games played where you hope to have the lowest score than anybody else.
The act of golf may be played in solitary, but the game is anything but. I hope you'll decide to join us at this year's golf outing for a chance to see why I love the game so much.
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